The ubiquitous face mask does more than protect against viral spread; it also changes the way we look at one another—and thus symbolizes the mystery of customer behavior in the pandemic. Several new McKinsey research efforts analyze the changes taking place in the homes of consumers, on their phones, and in stores. “Reimagining marketing in the next normal,” for example, documents six of the biggest shifts emerging from COVID-19. One of the most intriguing is the rising importance of neighborhoods: with travel largely shut down, marketers must figure out how to localize their outreach.

SOURCE: Mc Kinsey

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According to the food sector related to industry workers, they do not have the opportunity to work from home and are required to continue to work in their usual workplaces. Keeping all workers healthy and safe in the food manufacturing plant and supply chain is critical to surviving the current pervasive. Maintaining the transportation of food is an essential function to which all stakeholders along the food chain need to contribute. This is also required to maintain trust and consumer stratification in the safety and availability of food.

SOURCE: FNB News

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The pandemic has focused attention on how dependent we all are on what happens in other parts of the world for the products we use every day. As businesses look to reinvigorate their operations after the crisis, current innovations in sustainability certification can help build more resilient supply chains through a stronger focus on continuous improvement, transparency and shared responsibility. Here are three ways to do just that.

SOURCE: World Economic Forum

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Long queues outside essential services establishments, strained supply chains, rapidly shifting customer purchase patterns, wildly disconnected demand-supply requirements; these are just some of the visible impacts of the current COVID-19 situation in India. Disruptions to supply chains have been unprecedented in their scale and severity, and these are further amplified when the underlying supply chain is global in nature.

The current situation has truly brought to forefront the interconnectivity and interdependency that exists in every aspect of our lives, but nowhere else has this been more acutely felt than in the global supply chain. In this article, we highlight some of the expected changes and deliberate on impending issues in the supply chain industry in the ‘COVIDian’ era, from both customer and business perspectives.

SOURCE: Business Today

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COVID-19 is seen as the first crisis of the Anthropocene where economic activity has come in direct opposition to public health. When we are forced to think of new ways to make things work, it is likely that we will have new trends in the way we produce, distribute, purchase and consume things. Those trends, influenced by our new limitations, seem to favour a circular economy – the only economic philosophy that can sustainably cater to people’s needs in the long run.

SOURCE: World Economic Forum

Image credit: REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz

Many businesses in Africa have discovered new ways to bring goods and services to their clients during the COVID-19 lockdown. Both big and small entrepreneurs stand to benefit from online trade after the pandemic.

SOURCE: DW

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After the devastation wreaked by Hurricane Maria in 2017, the Dominican company, Rodney’s Wellness Retreat used a Direct Assistance Grant to rebuild and enhance the company’s resilience. Despite the halt to operations due to the COVID- 19 pandemic, Managing Director of the Retreat, Lucilla Lewis anticipates “a strong recovery”.

SOURCE: Carib-export

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The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly changed consumer behaviours and needs. Several Caribbean firms have strategically repositioned themselves to successfully access new opportunities that have arisen as a result of these evolving trends.  Review the various strategies your company can use to identify your opportunity.

SOURCE: Carib Export

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Brands need to focus on hyper-localisation by connecting with consumers where they are, as Covid-19 has dramatically changed consumer behavior and altered the path-to-purchase, according to Facebook and Boston Consulting Group.

SOURCE: The Drum

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Although the COVID-19 crisis has now hit many UK businesses, the first to feel the impact were those with global supply chains. Companies depending on items manufactured and sent from China suffered when the initial outbreaks began occurring in the de-facto factory of the world. A number of UK manufacturers, for example, had to halt production after specialist parts they were expecting to come from China did not arrive – showing just how fragile a global supply chain can be.

SOURCE: Supply Chain Digital

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